Udderly In The News

Staten Island Advance in the February 17th 2010 issue.
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Staten Island Advance in the July 31st 2008 issue.
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Suburban
November 29th 2001
Local man’s got milk – and an old fashioned way to sell it.
by Laurie Elkins-Solomon

Does it seem like only yesterday that the milkman delivered fresh bottles of milk to your doorstep?

Maybe that’s because he really did.

The vision of glistening glass milk bottles at your front door is a reality in the 21st century, thanks to people like Jeff Milling, owner of Udderly Delicious in Old Bridge.

“It’s very nostalgic,” Milling said while making a delivery Tuesday. “To this day, people still stop me and say they can’t believe that someone is actually making home deliveries of milk.”

When Milling started his business seven years ago, Udderly Delicious was solely a dairy delivery service. Over the years, he said, the success of the business warranted expanding it to include a wide variety of grocery items, including juice, bread, appetizers, pastry, gourmet meat and seafood.

However, the most popular item is still the old favorite – milk. The only difference is that nowadays most customers opt for the low-fat varieties rather than whole milk.

“Everyone still likes to buy chocolate milk as a treat, though,” Milling said with a smile.

Milling typically starts his morning delivery run at 4 a.m. During the course of each week, his refrigerated van brings milk to 400 customers in New Jersey and to Staten Island, N.Y. One-fourth of Milling’s customers live in Old Bridge, his hometown.

“Customers like that I’m dependable,” Milling said. “Even in the blizzard last year I didn’t miss a day.”

Milling’s customers include young families, working and retired people, those who have physical disabilities, and many people who simply have no time to shop at a supermarket. Milling also services several businesses, including office buildings, day-care centers and senior-citizen residences.

One customer is Brenda Gianchetti of Old Bridge, a stay-at-home mother of two young children. Gianchetti said she started ordering from Udderly Delicious when she realized she could not keep up with her family’s milk consumption.

“I was finding that early in the morning there was no milk,” she recalled.

Instead of having to repeatedly pack her kids into the car for a trip to the grocery store, Gianchetti decided to call the milkman.

“It’s just a convenience,” Gianchetti said. “And because the milk is in glass containers, it stays cold longer.”

Gianchetti said she also likes the fact that Milling is quick to fulfill last minute requests.

“If I run out of meat, I can call him the day before my delivery, and he’ll add it to my order,” Gianchetti said. “It’s like a ‘honey-do’ list.”

For more information about Udderly Delicious, call (732) 360-9991.


ASBURY PARK, N.J. — Got milk?

And better yet, can you get it delivered right to your doorstep?

Jeff Milling, founder of Udderly Delicious, says that you can — and his company is determined to revive the virtually dead service of having fresh milk delivered to your home, one customer at a time.

“It’s funny. In the beginning, people said, ‘Jeff, you’re crazy. There’s a reason why you don’t see milk delivery around anymore,’ ” Milling said.

But now, Milling — who began Udderly Delicious in 1995 — is delivering milk to some 300 customers in Monmouth and Middlesex counties daily, and he hopes to expand.

His customers are big fans of the old-fashioned service the company provides.

Good Eggs scrambling to bring fresh food home
“My kids love it, they think it’s the coolest thing,” said Jennifer O’Brien of Hazlet. “On Tuesday morning, my kids run out to the cooler to get it.”

In 1963, almost 30% of U.S. consumers got milk delivered to their homes. By 1975, that number had dropped to almost 7%. In 2005, only 0.4% of people had milk delivered to their homes according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

According to “The Bovine” blog, milk home delivery died off in the 1960s because of the emergence and convenience of large local grocery stores.

Also, the blog states that “improvements in home refrigeration and homogenization,” made it practical to keep store-bought milk for a longer time.

Jeff Milling delivers milk straight to customers’ doorsteps.
(Photo: Tom Spader, Asbury Park (N.J.) Press)
But none of that deterred Milling, an Old Bridge resident. After 20 years in the advertising business, he was working “crazy, crazy hours.”

“I got to a point where I just needed a change,” he said.

For Milling, change came in a bottle. He found a company called Byrne Dairy in Syracuse, N.Y., that bottled milk in glass, and then advertised to gauge interest.

The response, he said, was “very good.”

And so, in 1995, Udderly Delicious milk delivery service was born. Now, Udderly Delicious boasts approximately 300 customers, between 20 and 30 of whom are original from Milling’s very first route through Staten Island, which he still drives.

A normal day for Milling starts out at 4 p.m., when he does his billing and checks messages to determine order changes. Then, he forces himself to fall asleep at 7 p.m. He’s up at 1 a.m. when he starts delivering. He hits his last stop around 7:30 a.m.

“At that point I’m on autopilot,” Milling said. “It’s just me and the milk (outside).”

Jeff Milling of Udderly Delicious delivers eggs and
(Photo: Tom Spader, Asbury Park (N.J.) Press)
Milling, the self-proclaimed “one-man-show,” does all the work.

He delivers milk four days out of the week — two days in Staten Island, and two in New Jersey — and drives the route rain or shine.

And now that he’s home during the day, he gets to spend time with his kids.

Laurie Wheeler, of Middletown, just started getting Udderly Delicious deliveries about a month ago. She heard about the service via Facebook.

“I was very interested in the convenience of it, because I’m a mother of 2- and 3-year-old girls, and they drink a lot of milk,” said Wheeler, who gets two half gallons of milk delivered on a weekly basis.

“The prices are more reasonable than you think because it’s a delivery service,” she said.

Milk from Udderly Delicious costs $3.99 per half gallon in a glass bottle, compared with an average of $3.66 per gallon in the Northeast region in April according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Jennifer O’Brien, of Hazlet, said the convenience of the delivery is what makes the service worthwhile. Oh, and she loves the taste of the milk, too.

“Milk tastes better coming from a glass bottle as opposed to plastic,” O’Brien said. “I liken it to beer in a bottle (versus) a can.”


Staten Island Advance
October 25th 1999

Pictures from article
1 – 2

What time did you get up this morning? 6 o’clock? 7? Or maybe you slept to a delicious 7:30. So consider that Jeff Milling of Annadale was up and on the road before dawn for a workday that will stretch more than 16 hours, doing something he will tell you he never, ever imagined himself doing: Delivering milk.

When Milling was growing up in the Canarsie section of Brooklyn 42 years ago, his family got fresh bottled milk delivered straight to their doorstep from the neighborhood milkman, like most other families on his block.

“I knew when he’d be coming because I’d hear the bottles clanging,” Milling recalled last Monday, as he rattled around Grasmere in his refrigerated milk truck making deliveries, with me in tow.

“Growing up with that, I just thought it was the coolest thing. I looked at that milkman the way kids I deliver to look at me. I come up the walk and the kids will say, “Mommy, the milkman is here!” When people ask me what I do, and I tell them I have a milk delivery truck, they think it’s great.”

Not too many professions inspire that kind of reverence these days. Reporters? Nope. Lawyers? No way. Teachers? Not always. Presidents? Not any longer.

But being a milkman is golden. It’s mom and apple pie. The bottles clanging, the lid of the metal milk box snapping shut… then opening again to reveal ice cold bottles, wet and glistening, with stuff so good inside as to make you want to stand right there, peel off a bottle cap and take a long, slow drink.

It was with that sense of nostalgia, not to mention marketing acumen, that Milling, who holds a bachelor’s degree in business from Brooklyn College, chose to leave the world of advertising six years ago to start up Udderly Delicious, a one-man operation based out of his house.

“I decided I wanted to get out of what I was doing and get into a route-type thing,” explained Milling, the father of two. “I wanted to be able to make my own hours, to be in control. Also, I like dealing with people. I looked into a couple of different things, and then I remembered that as a kid I used to get bottled milk. I went online and did some research. I figured out what it would take and what I would need, and then I got started.

“People aren’t aware that you can get glass-bottled milk delivered home,” said Milling. “The Half-gallon bottles are my best seller. The Milk is fresher and creamier and it stays colder and lasts longer.

“Which is one reason why Milling’s milk truck sports the logo “Bottled Milk is Back.”

With Woodstock-generation shoulder-length hair and wire-rimmed glasses, Milling looks like he could get this supply of milk from Max Yasgur’s dairy instead of the Long Island dairy he drives out to at 4 a.m. every Monday and Thursday, rain or shine, in sickness and in health.

Unlike doctors, who no longer make house calls, Milling does. You may not have gotten your mail delivered during Hurricane Floyd last month, but if you were one of Milling’s 300 Staten Island customers, you got your milk delivered – not to mention your butter and your eggs, or one of the other specialty products Milling recently added to his repertoire.

“It took me the whole day and night to get everybody, but I got to everybody,” Milling said. “People are surprised to see me on Christmas Day, but if that’s when they’re supposed to get their milk delivered then that’s when they get it. I work in every kind of weather, even the big storms. I’ve never missed a day of deliveries, even if it took me forever.”

Vacations have been reduced to weekend family fishing getaways. Milling keeps his own books. His wife, Sharon, a social worker and an artist, is designing Udderly Delicious T-shirts and they’ve taken to prowling flea markets in search of cow tchotchkes, from refrigerator magnets to mailboxes to a black-and-white-cow-spotted blanket he keeps with him in the truck. His parents recently gave him a cow ice cream scoop that moos.

True to his profession, Milling personally drinks a glass of milk in the morning and one at night before he goes to bed.

“It’s hard work, but its exercise too,” Milling said, as he idled his truck outside a house to make a delivery to three fast-growing, milk-drinking boys, “I make a nice living from this business. And it’s not something anyone can take away from me. I built it from the ground up.”


Got milk?

And better yet, can you get it delivered right to your doorstep?

Jeff Melling, founder of Udderly Delicious, says that you can — and his company is determined to revive the virtually dead fad of having fresh milk delivered to your home, one customer at a time.

“It’s funny. In the beginning, people said, ‘Jeff, you’re crazy. There’s a reason why you don’t see milk delivery around anymore,’ ” Milling said.

But now, Milling — who began Udderly Delicious in 1995 — is delivering milk to some 300 customers in Monmouth and Middlesex counties daily, and he hopes to expand into the Red Bank area.

His customers are big fans of the old-fashioned service the company provides.

“My kids love it, they think it’s the coolest thing,” said Jennifer O’Brien of Hazlet. “On Tuesday morning, my kids run out to the cooler to get it.”

Make sure you are getting enough calcium
MilkMan.105Buy Photo

(Photo: TOM SPADER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER)
Bringing it back

In 1963, almost 30 percent of consumers got milk delivered to their homes. By 1975, that number had dropped to almost 7 percent. In 2005, only 0.4 percent of people had milk delivered to their homes according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

According to “The Bovine” blog, milk home delivery died off in the 1960s because of the emergence and convenience of large local grocery stores.

Also, the blog states that “improvements in home refrigeration and homogenization,” made it practical to keep store-bought milk for a longer time.

But none of that deterred Milling, an Old Bridge resident. After 20 years in the advertising business, he was working “crazy, crazy hours.”

“I got to a point where I just needed a change,” Milling said.

For Milling, change came in a bottle. He found a company called Byrne Dairy in Syracuse that bottled milk in glass, and then advertised to gauge interest.

The response, he said, was “very good.”

And so, in 1995, Udderly Delicious milk delivery service was born. Now, Udderly Delicious boasts approximately 300 customers, between 20 and 30 of which are original from Milling’s very first route through Staten Island, which he still drives.

Man delivers 1 pizza in Michigan, gets $2,084 tip
MilkMan.101Buy Photo

(Photo: TOM SPADER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER)
A normal day

A normal day for Milling starts out at 4 p.m., when he does his billing and checks messages to determine order changes. Then, he forces himself to fall asleep at 7 p.m. He’s up at 1 a.m. when he starts delivering. He hits his last stop around 7:30 a.m.

“At that point I’m on autopilot,” Milling said. “It’s just me and the milk (outside).”

Recently, Udderly Delicious expanded its delivery services to Monmouth County, and Milling, the self-proclaimed “one-man-show,” does all the work.

He covers from South Amboy to Freehold, and just started to expand from Hazlet to Atlantic Highlands.

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“Right now, I still have plenty of room to do more areas,” he said. “I’m looking to finish up and do all of Monmouth (County), and I’m looking to get into the Red Bank area.”

He delivers milk four days out of the week – two days in Staten Island, and two in New Jersey – and drives the route rain or shine.

And now that he’s home during the day, he gets to spend time with his kids.

Food facts that will make you say ‘WHAT?!’
Happy customers

Laurie Wheeler, of the Navesink section of Middletown, just started getting Udderly Delicious deliveries about a month ago. She heard about the service via Facebook.

“I was very interested in the convenience of it, because I’m a mother of 2- and 3-year-old girls, and they drink a lot of milk,” said Wheeler, who gets two half gallons of milk delivered on a weekly basis.

“The prices are more reasonable than you think because it’s a delivery service,” she said.

Convenience comes with a price. Milk from Udderly Delicious costs $3.99 per half gallon in a glass bottle, compared with an average of $3.66 per gallon in the Northeast region in April according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Milling said he can email price lists to potential customers if they contact him about services.

Wheeler said her neighbor gets almond milk deliveries from Milling.

Milling’s offerings expand beyond milk deliveries. He delivers any dairy product – eggs, butter, yogurt, and the like – but he can also deliver items such as meats, breads, muffins, juices, seafood, pasta and appetizer platters and desserts straight to your door.

Jennifer O’Brien, of Hazlet, has gotten food like stuffed chicken breast and scallop kabob deliveries from Udderly Delicious. She said the convenience of the delivery is what makes the service worthwhile – oh, and she loves the taste of the milk, too.

“Milk tastes better coming from a glass bottle opposed to plastic,” O’Brien said. “I liken it to beer in a bottle (versus) a can.”